Temptation

larry-paros-blog

Many tempting ideas present themselves to us daily. What makes them so enticing is the burning desire they create from titionis, “firebrand,” from intitiare, “to set on fire.”  They titillate  us from   titillare, “to tickle.” When we finally make an attempt at them, we do so from the Latin ad,  “to” or “towards” and temptare,” “to try,”  “feel out,” or “test.”

A classic case from Greek mythology of one  tempting fate is the story of  the King of Lydia. Befriended by the Gods, he betrayed them, stealing their nectar and ambrosia and testing their divinity, serving them the flesh of his own son. For his deeds he was doomed to stand forever thirsty and hungry in a pool of water up to his chin. Whenever he bent to drink, the water would recede. His efforts to reach toward fruit hanging from a bough directly above, caused the wind to carry the branch away from him. His name was Tantalus, and his name would forever be linked to “provoking desire and creating expectations without fulfillment.” That’s what makes things out of our reach so tantalizing. You and I are clearly above it all, being as one with Oscar Wilde who could “…resist everything except for temptation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *