Dogging It

larry-paros-blog

Time to step out and party a bit, an occasion to put on the dog — affect some  sophistication and urbanity.

It all began back in the 11th century with King Boleslaus II of Poland who began the tradition during a war with Russia.

Concerned about the increasing incidence of infidelity on the home front and its impact on troop morale, he legislated that children born of such trysts be taken to the woods to die and the offending women be obligated to nurse puppies in their stead. They were also required to take these dogs wherever they went, resulting in their appearing publicly with them on their lap.

The practice, however, proved so commonplace and ultimately so popular, that it also became fashionable, giving birth to the concept of the lap dog.

Lapdogs were the rage in America after the Civil War, especially King Charles and Blenheim spaniels, imperious looking dogs very distant from the mutts most people knew.

Seeing these snooty dogs pampered by their pretentious owners inspired the charge of  putting on the dog which began as college slang at Yale in the 1860s and has been hounding  us ever since.

Word Origin Comics: How to Jumpstart Your Life

Is everyone ready to take a quantum leap? Let’s begin:

“Those who don’t jump will never fly.”
― Leena Ahmad Almashat, Harmony Letters

“The sparrows jumped before they knew how to fly, and they learned to fly only because they had jumped”
― Lauren Oliver, Liesl & Po

comics-Larry-Paros

The second page of the comics is HERE

Check more Larry on Huffington Post

The Beatles

larry-paros-blog

It’s the stuff of which legends are made, or at least fables.  Prior to 1425, things fabulous were “mythical” or “legendary” from the French fabuleux and the Latin fabulosus, “celebrated in fable.” Not until 1609 did they also became “incredible.”

“Incredible” was the reaction of teenagers the world over to the Beatles. Breathlessly, they reduced fabulous to fab in the 1950s, making it the vogue around 1960, concluding with The Fab Four, the early nickname of the greatest pop rock group ever.

There’s been lots of talk about “The fifth Beatle.” Guesses as to his identity range from manager Brian Epstein to Stu Sutcliffe, an early member of the group who missed out on all the fame and glory.

On September 11, 1962, The Fab Four took its final form when Ringo Starr joined John, Paul, and George, replacing  Pete Best on the drums, making Pete probably — dare we say it — our “best” bet for number five.

 Yeh, yeh, yeh,” you say, a common corruption of “yes” (also “yeah”) since the 1920s and a component of their song “She loves you,” which for 14 years was Britain’s all-time best-selling 45 r.p.m. record. You do remember 45s, don’t you? Fabulous!

Word Origin Comics: Life Rubbing You the Wrong Way? Time to Get to the Root of It

Having trouble making it through the day? You’re probably caught up in the daily grind. The grind occurs when you push yourself to attain a certain goal but end up being caught up in the particulars, as in “I’ve been on the grind lately trying to pay my bills.” It’s closely akin to gears grinding when working beyond their capacity.

“Life was not to be sitting in hot amorphic leisure in my backyard idly writing or not-writing, as the spirit moved me. It was, instead, running madly, in a crowded schedule, in a squirrel cage of busy people. Working, living, dancing, dreaming, talking, kissing — singing, laughing, learning. The responsibility, the awful responsibility of managing (profitably) 12 hours a day for 10 weeks is rather overwhelming when there is nothing, no one, to insert an exact routine into the large unfenced acres of time — which it is so easy to let drift by in soporific idling and luxurious relaxing. It is like lifting a bell jar off a securely clockwork-like functioning community, and seeing all the little busy people stop, gasp, blow up and float in the inrush, (or rather outrush,) of the rarified scheduled atmosphere — poor little frightened people, flailing impotent arms in the aimless air. That’s what it feels like: getting shed of a routine. Even though one had rebelled terribly against it, even then, one feels uncomfortable when jounced out of the repetitive rut. And so with me. What to do? Where to turn? What ties, what roots? as I hang suspended in the strange thin air of back-home?”

― Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

Learning something new is a fabulous way to be refreshed. When work can grind you down, something about learning a new activity thrills the soul. It reminds you that the world is bigger than your desk and your to-do list.

—John Ortberg

Something new for today is that the Urban( slang) Dictionary also lists a “grind” as a “group of lesbians.”

“A gaggle of geese…a herd of elephants…a grind of lesbians.”

“I went to the coffeehouse to grab an espresso, but a grind of lesbians was protesting for fair trade coffee, blocking the door.”

larry paros comics

Check more Larry on Huffington Post